Etiket arşivi: research

Professor Calls For “Google Type” Brain Chip Implants


A New York Professor has advocated the idea of Google type brain implant chips that would “improve human memory”, an idea which mirrors already active projects funded by the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

“However difficult the practicalities, there’s no reason in principle why a future generation of neural prostheticists couldn’t pick up where nature left off, incorporating Google-like master maps into neural implants.” writes New York University professor of psychology Gary Marcus.

“This in turn would allow us to search our own memories — not just those on the Web — with something like the efficiency and reliability of a computer search engine.” he postulates.

“How much would you pay to have a small memory chip implanted in your brain if that chip would double the capacity of your short-term memory? Or guarantee that you would never again forget a face or a name?”

Clearly DARPA would pay quite a lot, given that the research arm of the US military continues to fund scientific development of that exact technology.

The justification for the continued funding of such research is to develop a substitute for damaged or diseased brain regions, holding promise for victims of Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and other brain traumas.

Yet even the scientists currently at work on such projects know that the real application for the implant devices would be in the commercial and military sectors. After all, why would the Pentagon have such a keen interest in curing Alzheimer’s?

In 2003 Popular Science reported:

Medicine aside, Biomedical engineer Theodore Berger sees potential commercial and military applications for the brain chip, which is partially funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Learning how to build sophisticated electronics and integrate them into human brains could one day lead to cyborg soldiers and robotic servants, he says.

In his Times piece, New York Professor Gary Marcus concludes:

“Would this turn us into computers? Not at all. A neural implant equipped with a master memory map wouldn’t impair our capacity to think, or to feel, to love or to laugh; it wouldn’t change the nature of what we chose to remember.”

Clearly Mr Marcus has not considered that there is a very good reason why the human brain blocks out certain memories or feelings and why it correlates information in the way that it does.

Furthermore, cataloguing a person’s memories on an external source invariably means that an entity external to that particular person, be it a company, corporation or government, could conceivably gain access to those memories.

The more that entity knows about the population, the more it can and inevitably will use that information to control it for their own benefit and profit.

This concept may seem completely outlandish to many, yet it has been the central focus of DARPA activities for some time with projects such as LifeLog, which seeks to gain a multimedia, digital record of everywhere a person goes and everything they see, hear, read, say and touch.

Wired Magazine has reported:

On the surface, the project seems like the latest in a long line of DARPA’s “blue sky” research efforts, most of which never make it out of the lab. But DARPA is currently asking businesses and universities for research proposals to begin moving LifeLog forward.

“What national security experts and civil libertarians want to know is, why would the Defense Department want to do such a thing?” the article asks. The answer lies in the stated goal of the US military – “Total Spectrum Dominance”.

Furthermore, Mr Marcus’ assertions that the neuro technology would not be in any way dominant over a person’s capacity to think, does not tally with DARPA’s Brain Machine Interfaces enterprise, a $24 million project reported on in the August 5, 2003 Boston Globe.

The project is developing technology that “promises to directly read thoughts from a living brain – and even instill thoughts as well… It does not take much imagination to see in this the makings of a matrix-like cyberpunk dystopia: chips that impose false memories, machines that scan for wayward thoughts, cognitively augmented government security forces that impose a ruthless order on a recalcitrant population.” The Globe reported.

Government funded advances in neurotechnology which also focus on developing the ability to essentially read people’s minds should also set alarm bells ringing.

It is also well documented that the military and the federal government have been dabbling in mind control and manipulation experimentation for decades.

Mr Marcus may be a well meaning scientist and may very well see such technology as progressive for humanity, but when it is being developed by military commanders under governments that have killed and oppressed billions across the globe in the last century alone, the prospect becomes somewhat sullied to say the least.

Researchers demonstrate first backdoor “hack” into the human brain


By Nick Gilbert

Using an off-the-shelf Emotiv BCI, researchers have shown that it’s possible to ‘hack’ a human brain

Once the preserve of science fiction, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have advanced to the point where they can even be found in novelty headwear, which only makes an achievement of an international team of scientists more frightening. Using an off-the-shelf Emotiv BCI costing only a few hundred dollars, the team has shown that it’s possible to "hack" a human brain and pull things like bank details straight out of your skull.

For their experiment, researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Geneva and California (Berkeley) called in a group of Computer Science students. The students knew they were part of a security-related experiment but did not know the objectives or that they were being "hacked." Each of these students put on a Emotiv BCI and were sat down in front of a computer that displayed a series of images such as maps, banks, card PINs, and so on.

This graph shows the P300 signal that results from a target stimulus verses the signal from a non target stimulus (Image: Martinovic et al.)

By tracking the P300 brain signal, given off when your brain registers particular kinds of stimuli as meaningful or useful, the researchers found that they were able to consistently reduce the entropy (or random data) in each variable they tested by about 10 to 40 percent, and demonstrated marked improvements over random guessing. In other words, the subjects were "leaking" information via the BCI that the researchers could then use to work out, say, the bank they used or where they lived.

Given the use of social engineering in many "hacks" and the many attempts to discover private information on social media sites such as Facebook, this study suggests that these devices could potentially leak even more information about you without you knowing about it.

This graph shows the performance of the BCI test using three different data-response classification techniques with the dashed line showing the performance of random guesswork (Image: Martinovic et al.)

"The simplicity of our experiments suggests the possibility of more sophisticated attacks," writes the team in their paper on the experiment. "For example, an uninformed user could be easily engaged into ‘mindgames’ that camouflage the interrogation of the user and make them more cooperative. Furthermore, with the ever increasing quality of devices, success rates of attacks will likely improve."

They also note a much more basic issue; these BCIs store the data they pull from your brain as part of their normal use. The stream of data from the inbuilt EEGs could potentially be exploited by malware, meaning that as things stand, "the development of new attacks can be achieved with relative ease and is only limited by the attacker’s own creativity."

The solution, at least for the moment, is simple. If you use a BCI, be careful what you think.

The team presented their paper at the recent Usenix Security conference, held at Bellevue, Washington.

Source: Usenix, via Extreme Tech

DARPA Researches Genetic Manipulation to Create Super Soldiers


The US military’s future technology division is reportedly eyeing tampering with soldiers’ genes, allowing them to go for days without food or sleep and re-grow limbs lost in battle or due to landmines.

Scientists at the Pentagon’s high-tech Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency hope to find a way to affect certain genes to make the human body do amazing things, like using body fat more efficiently, says British newspaper Sunday Express.

The journalists talked to novelist Simon Conway, who was given a behind-the-scenes glimpse of DARPA’s research, which may seem like it comes straight out of a science fiction novel.

“If you can efficiently convert fat into energy you don’t need to feed your soldiers as often,” Conway said. “So you can send them into battle in remote areas plump and they live off their own fat.

“It is all about improving efficiency of energy creation in the body. Soldiers would be able to run at Olympic speeds, carry large weights and go without sleep and without food,” he said.

Another possible chilling breakthrough is a drug that can make people go for hours without sleep and stay alert, Professor Joel Garreau, of Arizona State University told the tabloid.

“It was tested by the US army on helicopter pilots. They found that after 40 hours, pilots actually had better concentration levels than if they had rested. It is much better than amphetamines, which affect decision making and have led to many so-called friendly fire incidents,” he said.

There is also a project to make soldiers regenerate lost limbs.

“There are well-documented cases of young children losing a finger and it grows back. The trick is how to identify the trigger. Now it’s a well-funded area of research,” he said.

The agency, sometimes dubbed Pentagon’s “mad scientists division”, is known for reaching for far-fetched, eyebrow-raising technology. But it has its record of breakthroughs, including the creation of the precursors of the modern internet.

Among other things, DARPA’s $2 billion-a-year budget is used for a hypersonic unmanned vehicle, insect-sized spy drones, mini-satellites that can cannibalize other spacecraft and new brands of cyber weapons.

DARPA and NIH to fund ‘human body on a chip’ research


MIT-led team to receive up to $32 million from DARPA and NIH to develop technology that could accelerate pace and efficiency of pharmaceutical testing

(Credit: DARPA)

Researchers in the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT plan to develop a technology platform that will mimic human physiological systems in the laboratory, using an array of integrated, interchangeable engineered human tissue constructs, with $32 million funding over the next five years from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

A cooperative agreement between MIT and DARPA worth up to $26.3 million will be used to establish a new program titled “Barrier-Immune-Organ: MIcrophysiology, Microenvironment Engineered TIssue Construct Systems” (BIO-MIMETICS) at MIT, in collaboration with researchers at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, MatTek Corp. and Zyoxel Ltd.

The BIO-MIMETICS proposal was one of two award winners selected as part of the Microphysiological Systems (MPS) program at DARPA, and will be led by MIT professor Linda Griffith in collaboration with MIT professors Steven Tannenbaum, Darrell Irvine, Paula Hammond, Eric Alm and Douglas Lauffenburger. Jeffrey Borenstein and Shankar Sundaram will lead the work at Draper Laboratory, Patrick Hayden will lead the work at MatTek, and David Hughes will lead the work at Zyoxel.

The BIO-MIMETICS program will combine technologies developed at MIT, Draper Laboratory, MatTek and Zyoxel to create a versatile microfluidic platform that can incorporate up to 10 individual engineered human microphysiological organ system modules in an interacting circuit. The modules will be designed to mimic the functions of specific organ systems representing a broad spectrum of human tissues, including the circulatory, endocrine, gastrointestinal, immune, integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

The goal of the program is to create a versatile platform capable of accurately predicting drug and vaccine efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics in preclinical testing. The BIO-MIMETICS team anticipates that the platform will be suitable for use in regulatory review, amenable to rapid translation to the biopharmaceutical research community, and adaptable for integration of future technologies (such as advances in stem cell technologies and personalized medicine).

A cooperative agreement worth up to $6.25 million from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at NIH will support a complementary research initiative at MIT and Draper Laboratory, in collaboration with professors Alan Wells, Donna Stolz and Raman Venkataramanan at the University of Pittsburgh. The aim of this project is to model cancer metastasis therapies using engineered human tissue constructs, with a goal of adapting this work to the integrated BIO-MIMETICS platform.

Related:

MK ULTRA – CIA Mind Control Research – Human Experiments in the United States


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